God of War (2005)

Just a few months ago I tried God of War for the first time ever. I found it to be an interesting game but quite a challenge at times. God of War is an action role-playing game that is highly fantasized about ancient Sparta with Gods and monsters. This is quite intriguing, however, it was […]

Just a few months ago I tried God of War for the first time ever. I found it to be an interesting game but quite a challenge at times.

God of War is an action role-playing game that is highly fantasized about ancient Sparta with Gods and monsters. This is quite intriguing, however, it was plenty difficult at times. Even though I was playing the game on easy, as I got pretty far in the game it seemed as if the game developers forgot there was easy setting.

A good example to show the level of difficulty is the mission when Kratos (the main character) ends up in Hell and is trying to escape. Hell is a whole mess of difficult. Especially when Kratos needs to climb the spinning totem poles of DEATH. Kratos moves very slowly and the totem poles spin rather fast. If one spike on the totem pole touches Kratos (or just gets a little too close) he falls all the way back down to the ground. Yes, you read that correctly, I actually got knocked down plenty of times when Kratos never got touched.

For those of you that may not know, in video games there are aspects you see and others you don’t see. You see Kratos climbing up the wall or the totem pole spining, however it’s not actually him that gets stabbed from the spikes but the invisible box(es) around him that touch and interact with the spikes, which also have their own invisible boxes. These are referred to as colliders. Colliders are what make objects physical in games. That way you can’t just walk through things, like walls or the ground floor. Other colliders, like the ones around the spikes tell the game that if Kratos touches them he gets hurt. Ideally, these colliders will be exactly over any character, NPC, or game object, that way things interact appropriately. However, since this is an older game these colliders extend beyond Kratos’ body and limbs. So there were plenty of times he would get knocked down when he shouldn’t. That gets pretty frustrating. It was as if the developers were trying to make this just so precise and forgot it was 2005 and their game engine technology was as finely tuned as they are now a days. Today in 2017 it probably wouldn’t be a problem because game engines are much more sophisticated. The developers would be able to get the precise timing they wanted and the spikes would actually need to touch Kratos in order to knock him down.

To sum up, the game was interesting and fun but be prepared for a challenge. In time I will probably try the next God of War game.